Sythyry (sythyry) wrote,
Sythyry
sythyry

Originally published at Sythyry. Please leave any comments there.

Maternal Visitation [21 Lage 4261]

~Mother~ showed up shortly after dawn. I suppose I should
use zir common name, Eitharheinen, since I’m the only one
who calls zir ~mother~. Zie’s Zemi’s ~father~.

In any case, Eitharheinen flew around and peered through my
window before tapping on it. This was unwise of zir. I had
induced my boyfriend to stay the night, now that he’s
admitted to my housemates that he is indeed my
boyfriend. (Yes, they all knew it before, especially the one
who’d arranged it.) this was wise of me. I had left the
curtains open in the night, thinking that it was night and
nobody would see. This was unwise of me.

I shan’t record the actual conversation. It requires a
certain presence of mind to remember the details, and, of
course, being woken by a parent when one is abed with one’s
traff lover whom one has not yet quite manage to mention to
zir is not, in some cases, wholly conducive to presence of mind.

Zie was not pleased.

I introduced them as best I could.

Zie was not pleased that I was performing unnatural
junctions with a member of the upper nobility.

We debated the matter. Zie did indeed recommend continence
for a few decades, or occasional trips to one of the cities
with a larger Zi Ri population to find suitable playmates.
No, zie couldn’t introduce me to anyone. Yes, zie admitted
that I’d have much better luck when I was at least a century
old. No, zie wouldn’t want me to take that much time out of
my classes. No, zie didn’t know that I couldn’t leave
Vheshrame any time soon.

“Um … why can’t you leave Vheshrame any time soon?” zie asked.

“Did you hear about the nendrai?”

Zie had, indeed, heard about the nendrai. That was, indeed,
why zie was coming to visit. It did, indeed, distract zir
from my boyfriend. He did, indeed, take that opportunity to
switch to water form and slink off.

“Paying last respects to your doomed child?” I asked.

“Not quite that, Sythyry. Glikkonen sent me something for
you,” said Eitharheinen.

The “something” was a glass teardrop containing twelve tiny
Rassimel scholars made of twelve different colors of very
thin metal wire. “This is the Eye of Mirizan and Melizan.”

Me:“Two people sharing one eye? That seems a
bit, well, overly cozy.”

Never, never use phrases like “overly cozy” when an
aggressive parent has just caught you being overly cozy with
a sort of person whom zie is categorically opposed to you
ever being intimate with.

Approximately six hundred and eighteen years later — or a
third of an hour by the rolling of the sun — zie calmed
down enough to tell me what the Eye of Mirizan and Melizan
is for.

Me:“Will it keep me safe from
Vaisessasilmin?”

Eitharheinen:“Well … no. I need to talk to
Zemi about getting this ridiculous job put on someone more
expendable. I can’t imagine why zie didn’t tell the Duke to
do that in the first place.”

Me:“Zie tried.”

Then I had to describe the whole scene with the duke and
all.

Me:“What does this famous Eye do?”

Eitharheinen:“It analyzes magic, and writes
down what it sees.”

Me:“Um … why is this helpful?”

Eitharheinen:“So we know if she’s done anything
to you. So we have several clues about how to fix
it.”

Me:“Oh… I suppose that is
useful.”

Eitharheinen:“It is, in any case, the best we
have available in short order. The other choices were
Holocaust War weaponry, or more modern variations on
that.”

Me:“I daresay that the duke wouldn’t be wholly
pleased if I laid waste to half his countryside trying to
kill Vae.”

Eitharheinen:“No. The more so since nobody is
supposed to have anything like that anymore.”

Me:“Well, I’m certainly glad that our family
doesn’t have anything like that anymore. Also glad that
nobody else’s family does either.”

Eitharheinen:“Well, you’ve certainly picked up
the courtly wit.”

Me:“I was trying for a course of study
in social climbing and strong magic, really I was.”

Eitharheinen:“You’re supposed to climb the
social ladder with the counts’ children. Not climb
on the counts’ children. See, I can still do it
too.”

Me:“Much as my filial piety demands that I
listen to you speak ill of my choice of lovers for as long
as you want, I do have to go do an errand or two. I don’t
want to keep Vae waiting.”

Eitharheinen:“Oh! Today? I’m going to go exert
~paternal~ influence on Zemi, then.”

We wished each other luck, most sincerely. I did pause a
bit to scribble this in my journal, though. It’s a calming
sort of thing, and I don’t really want to be quite so
jarred-off and upset as from ~mother~ yelling at me when I
go deal with Vae by myself for the first time, with only
this Eye thing to protect me.

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